Australia Skills Assessment: A Guide for Prospective Visa Applicants

Emigrating to Australia can sometimes be complex and involve multiple steps, including an Australian skills assessment. The Australian skills assessment is a crucial step in the process as it helps to determine whether an individual’s skills and qualifications meet the standards required for their nominated occupation here in Australia.

In this overview, we will look at the steps involved in the skills assessment process, including determining the relevant assessing authority, gathering the required documents, submitting an application, and understanding the outcome of the assessment. Importantly, we will also touch on how the process may be different for the 482 / Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa, which is a temporary visa that allows an employer to sponsor a skilled worker to fill a position that cannot be filled by an Australian citizen or permanent resident (and the focus of our website here at 482jobs.com ūüėä)

On this point:

Are Skills Assessments Required For 482 Visas?

The skills assessment process for Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visas can be complex and varies depending on the individual’s nationality and occupation.

The process may require passport holders of certain nationalities, working in certain trades occupations, to provide a skills assessment as part of their TSS visa application.

The list of specified nationalities and trades occupations can be found on the Trades Recognition Australia (TRA) website; we’ve¬†also included a summary in the table below.

Skill Assessment Exemptions for 482 Visa Applicants

Exemptions may apply for specific individuals applying for a TSS (subclass 482) visa and are required to provide a skills assessment. These exemptions include:

  1. Hold a subclass 457 or 482 visa: If an individual holds a valid subclass 457 or 482 visa and met the primary criteria for grant of those visas, they may be exempt from providing a skills assessment for a TSS visa.
  2. Employed by an overseas business: If an individual is employed by an overseas business and that business is now proposing to sponsor and nominate them in the same (or similar) position in Australia, they may be exempt from providing a skills assessment.
  3. Holds relevant qualification: If an individual holds a relevant qualification specified in the ANZSCO for the nominated position and this qualification was obtained by completing a course or training in Australia for the occupation, they may be exempt from providing a skills assessment.
  4. Holds licensing, registration or membership: If the occupation requires a license, registration or membership to perform the occupation, and the individual holds such licensing, registration or membership, they may be exempt from providing a skills assessment.
  5. Meet the Offshore Skills Assessment Program requirements: If an individual meets the Offshore Skills Assessment Program requirements set out by Trades Recognition Australia (TRA) in the nominated occupation, they may be exempt from providing a skills assessment
  6. For certain occupation: if the individual is a Specialist Manager NEC. (ANZSCO 139999) or Program or Project Administrator (ANZSCO 511112), holds relevant qualifications, and their proposed base salary is greater than AUD 180,000. and their sponsoring employer also needs to be an Accredited Standard Business Sponsor they may be exempt from the skill assessment

The table below provides a summary of the occupations where an assessment is required:

TSS OCCUPATIONS

‚Äč PERSONS WHO HOLD A PASSPORT ISSUED BY

  AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICIAN [321111] Fiji, Hong Kong SAR, India, Macau SAR, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
  BAKER [351111] China, Fiji, Hong Kong SAR, India, Macau SAR, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
  CABINETMAKER [394111] Brazil, Fiji, Hong Kong SAR, India, Macau SAR, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
  CARPENTER [331212] Brazil, Fiji, Hong Kong SAR, India, Macau SAR, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
¬†¬†CARPENTER AND JOINER [331211] ‚ÄčBrazil, Fiji, Hong Kong SAR, India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč CHEF [351311] ‚ÄčBangladesh*, Brazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR, Nepal,¬†Pakistan*,¬†Papua New Guinea,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč COOK [351411] ‚ÄčBangladesh*, Brazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Nepal,¬†Pakistan*,¬†Papua New Guinea, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
¬† DIESEL MOTOR MECHANIC‚Äč [321212] ‚ÄčFiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč ELECTRICIAN (GENERAL) [341111] ‚ÄčFiji, Hong Kong SAR, India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Vietnam
¬†¬†ELECTRICIAN (SPECIAL CLASS) [341112]‚Äč ‚ÄčFiji, Hong Kong SAR, India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Vietnam
‚Äč FITTER (GENERAL) [323211] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
¬† FITTER AND TURNER [323212]‚Äč ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč FITTER-WELDER [323213] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč JOINER [331213] ‚ÄčBrazil, Fiji, Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč METAL FABRICATOR [322311] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚Äč METAL MACHINIST (FIRST CLASS) [323214] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčMETAL FITTERS AND MACHINISTS (NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED) [323299] ‚Äč‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčMOTOR MECHANIC (GENERAL) [321211] ‚Äč‚ÄčFiji, Hong Kong SAR, India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčPANELBEATER [324111] ‚Äč‚ÄčChina, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR, India, Macau SAR, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
PASTRYCOOK [351112]‚Äč ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Papua New Guinea, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčSHEETMETAL TRADES WORKER [322211] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčTOOLMAKER [323412] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
‚ÄčWELDER (FIRST CLASS) [322313] ‚ÄčBrazil, China, Fiji,¬†Hong Kong SAR,¬†India,¬†Macau SAR,¬†Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe

It is important to note that these exemptions, countries, and occupations may change, and it’s essential to check the specific requirements and guidelines with the relevant assessing authority and the department of home affairs before applying.

What Does the Australia Skills Assessment Process Look Like?

If you are looking to move to Australia using an occupation on the list above and currently reside in one of the countries on this list. You will need to undertake an Australian skills assessment. The process of completing your Australian skills assessment goes through several stages, which we will look to summarise below.

1. Determine the relevant assessing authority

Each occupation has a specific assessing authority responsible for assessing applicants’ skills and qualifications. The relevant assessing authority will differ for each occupation and can be found by checking our Occupations Lists. These lists contain a list of occupations currently in demand in Australia. You need to select an occupation on one of these lists to be eligible to apply for a skilled visa. The government regularly reviews and updates the lists, so it’s important to check them before applying.

2. Gather all required documents

Depending on your occupation and the assessing authority, you will need to gather and provide a range of documents to support your application. These documents may include qualifications, work experience, and language proficiency test results. It’s important to ensure that all the documents you provide are certified and translated if required. The assessing authority will provide a list of the required documents, including the format and certification requirements.

3. Submit your application

Once you have gathered all the required documents, you must submit your application to the relevant assessing authority. This can usually be done online, and you will need to pay a fee to assess your application. The fee can vary based on the occupation and the assessing authority, so it’s important to check the fees before you apply. You will also need to explain your work experience and how it aligns with the occupation you have nominated.

4. Application review

The assessing authority will review your application and determine whether you meet the standards required for your nominated occupation. This can include assessing your qualifications, work experience, and language proficiency. The assessment process can take several weeks or even months, and the outcome of the assessment is binding. The assessing authority will provide a written outcome of the assessment, indicating whether or not they consider you to meet the standards for the nominated occupation.

5. Positive skills assessment

If your application is successful, the assessing authority will issue you with a positive skills assessment. A positive skills assessment is a requirement for some visa categories, such as the Skilled Independent Visa (subclass 189) and the Skilled Nominated Visa (subclass 190). It’s important to note that a positive skills assessment alone does not guarantee visa approval, and additional requirements, such as passing health and character checks, should also be met.

6. Visa application

Once you have received a positive skills assessment, you can apply for a visa. The Department of Home Affairs will use the information on your skills assessment as part of their assessment of your visa application. You will also need to meet other requirements, such as passing health and character checks. Your visa application will be based on the information provided in your skills assessment, so the information provided must be accurate and complete.

7. Visa condition compliance.

Once you receive the visa, you need to comply with all the visa conditions, such as maintaining a valid skill assessment for the occupation and meeting requirements such as minimum hours of work, insurance, and other conditions mentioned in the visa. Failure to comply with these conditions can lead to the cancellation of the visa.

8. Moving To Australia

Once you have received your visa and complied with visa conditions, you will be able to live, work and study in Australia, as per the terms and conditions of the visa. It’s important to remember that the visa may have conditions such as where you can live and work and that you should maintain a valid skill assessment while holding the visa, as it may be a requirement to apply for permanent residence in the future.

Other frequent questions:

How long is an Australian skills assessment valid?

The validity period of a skills assessment can vary depending on the organization conducting the assessment and the occupation being assessed. In general, most skills assessments are valid for a period of 3 years from the date it was issued. This means that within that three-year period an applicant can use this skills assessment as evidence to support their visa application. It’s worth noting that the validity of a skills assessment may be affected by changes to the applicant’s qualifications, employment, or the specific requirements of the visa they are applying for, which could make an assessment invalid. Therefore, an applicant should check the expiration date and specific skills assessment requirements before using it to support their visa application.

How much does an Australian Skills Assessment Cost?

The cost of a skills assessment can vary depending on the organization conducting the assessment and the occupation being assessed. The cost ranges from around $300 to $700 AUD. It is important to note that the cost of a skills assessment is not covered by the visa application fee and must be paid separately. Additionally, it is important to consider that if an applicant does not pass the skills assessment, they will have to pay again to retake it.

Also noteworthy is that the Australian government is subsidising the fees for certain occupations in high demand. We recommend checking the Assessment Company Website for the current fees – You can view a complete list, including the website address, by clicking here. (Opens in a new tab).

Conclusion

In conclusion, the skills assessment process is an essential step in when emigrating to Australia. The process determines whether an individual’s skills and qualifications meet the standards required for their nominated occupation. It is also important to note that the skills assessment process may differ for the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482) as it may have different procedures and requirements than other visa categories. It’s also important to check the specific requirements and guidelines with the relevant assessing authority and the department of home affairs before applying.

Questions?

Do you have any comments or questions about the Australia Skills Assessment Process? Add them in our comments below.